Elimination Diet Spaghetti

DSC_0042I called it “insta-food” on the shopping list. Those things that could be plunked in a microwave and nuked until they exploded, or boiled in a pot. Junk that could be made and devoured in something less than 20 minutes, to be honest. There are always those days when you just need something fast. One insta-food was spaghetti. Comforting, fragrant, hot, and mostly healthy, I could use canned sauce and noodles to make marinara quickly. If I threw in some veggies, I’d be feeling good about my skills in the kitchen because I had successfully washed and sliced mushrooms. 🙂 Add in some sausage that I’d thawed hurriedly under hot water in the sink, and maybe a package of salad, and I’d have something on the table that actually looked like a real meal. The elimination diet makes such insta-food harder… but not impossible!

First, noodles. This was the easiest problem to solve! I went with brown rice noodles from Meijer for the picture above, but I love spaghetti squash too. Other vegetables, like zucchini, can be spiraled into “noodles” as well. Brown rice noodles have about a 35 second window of tasty to gloop, despite what the packaging may promise. I’d recommend sampling often and pulling them off heat right when they’re almost but not quite to where you want them to be cooked. I covered the noodles in sea salt, garlic, and olive oil to keep them from sticking … and because it was oh-so-good to simply steal a few straight from the colander.

Second, sauce. I wanted the “I-can’t-cook!” type, found in a can. It is very difficult to find a canned sauce that doesn’t have soy, corn, wheat, or sugar added. Meijer came through with Classico Riserva pasta sauce. It’s not the cheapest sauce, but at least for the money the taste is fantastic.

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Third, veggies. I added onions, mushrooms, slivered zucchini, and bell pepper. I’m a veggie fan. It also gave me another chance to dust the white powder and pink crystals of life, good ol’ NaCl, over everything… and here perhaps I should mention that I am on the exact opposite of a low-sodium diet. When I cook at home for my salt-sensitive family, I add a little Italian seasoning to the sauteing veggies and crank salt over my plate separately, and it seems to work for them. 🙂

Last, meat. This is perhaps the hardest. It is nearly impossible to find a chicken sausage without pork casing (why?!!?). Sugar is by far the most persistent additive I’ve found, with even Trader Joe’s Italian chicken sausage wiping out on this last hurdle. I can neither confirm not deny the rumors that Whole Foods has an Elimination Diet-friendly sausage, but online chatter seems to indicate this is a regional phenomena. (The fact that Whole Foods nickname is “Whole Paycheck” also means I tend to steer clear of the local store.)  Fortunately I come from a family that has long believed in the cost-savings and health benefits of a good pound of ground turkey. 🙂 Brown ground turkey in oil (I usually use canola and/or olive), adding in garlic, salt, pepper, and Italian seasoning to make a quick sausage substitute. I like to add extra basil and red pepper flakes for a spicy/sweet kick.

While the meat browns, add in your other veggies, then cover in sauce. Simmer. To me, it tastes like home.

Two important notes:

  • First, this has all sorts of veggies in it that are not low histamine. Right now I’m on a limited-histamine version of the Elimination diet, but I sense that my days of pepper- and tomato-laden kitchen experiments are going to be rather short-lived. While it wouldn’t fulfill my not-so-secret plan to find a quick-fix, bad-cook meal, there are tomato-less spaghetti sauces.I recently found this page, and it looks very promising: http://www.marinyacottagekitchen.com/recipes/archives/06-2013#.WNbDX2e1thE
  • I bought Trader Joe’s Vegan Mozzarella. First, it is NOT Elimination Diet compatible if you’re avoiding corn. Somehow I missed the corn starch in the ingredient list, even though I’ve tried to be diligent about twisting packages sideways and gently pulling aside flaps of plastic to squint at the tiny black ink under the glaring fluorescents in the dark hours of exhausted after-work shopping. I will confess. I tried a little anyway. The final judgement? … well, you can eat it, but it tastes like…melted plastic. It does look like cheese and melt like cheese, and perhaps if one grew up on Cheese Whiz and Kraft Mac and Cheese (and is allowed corn), it would even taste a little like “cheese.” After a tentative bite or two, I did the unthinkable: I scraped that part into the trash.DSC_0057
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