Birthday Jubilation

Tomorrow will be my birthday.

I don’t write my birthday down on the calendar anymore. I put other people’s birthdays down on the calendar without hesitation. I even schedule reminders on my phone’s calendar, and it politely counts down the last 7 days until the celebration. Somehow, I can’t do the same with mine.

It’s not because I’m dreading growing another year older. It’s not because I think it will be a depressing day, full of regrets that I’ve lived so many years but have yet to fulfill my 4 year old self’s dream of climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro, or some such goal. It’s not because I think that birthdays are overblown affairs. Actually, I enjoy and celebrate birthdays with a zeal that borders on the absurd.

I don’t put my birthday on any of my calendars because some bit of me is afraid that if I put it down, I’m expecting it to happen. Somehow, it feels like if I do grab my sharpie and just scrawl it down on the blank white square I, who don’t believe in jinxes, will somehow jinx it. If it is another event on my phone then maybe, like any other event, it could get canceled. I don’t want to count on getting another year older, because in the topsy-turvy world of illness that I live in, getting another year older is far from guaranteed. Because I don’t know if my birthday really will happen, I don’t put it down.

Life is not guaranteed. The next day might not happen for any of us. It’s not quite like the sunny commercials with the song “Tomorrow” from Annie playing. I love tomorrow.  It just that, unlike Annie, I don’t always feel “it’s only a day away.” Somehow my friends seem to traipse through their days, knowing that life could end quickly but seemingly only rarely feeling the gut punch of it. But even though I walk the same halls that they do, go to the same library and grocery store, and watch the same television commercials, that’s not my life. You see, I have chronic and largely invisible illnesses.

Most of what I have isn’t the sort of thing that kills you, at least not directly. I have POTS – postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome. My body doesn’t automatically adjust for the change from lying down to sitting to standing. There’s good days and then there are floor days. Will it kill me? Not directly, not unless I happen to pass out somewhere dangerous.  I also have chronic pain conditions, and while fibromylagia and/or myofascial pain syndrome and neuralgia won’t kill you, they occasionally made me wish for it. Like many chronically ill patients, I’m still waiting and fighting for other diagnoses that might be years in coming — answers to questions about an undifferentiated autoimmune condition and random bouts of anaphylaxis. Both of those have the potential to kill me, either slowly or quickly. Even if we don’t have the diagnosis down yet on paper, it’s serious enough so that my doctors have already started treatment.

My doctors are not good about talking about the emotional impact of these conditions. Once or twice, immediately after I was diagnosed with one condition or another, I was handed sheaves of paper as I blundered out the door. Somewhere on the back of the generic printout would be a similarly generic, bland paragraph about support groups and depression.

No one told me that I would find myself staring at an unmarked day on the calendar and wondering what was wrong with me. Why couldn’t I just mark it off in the cheerful, sunshiny color I used for every other fun event, and move on?

Eventually, I did move on. I just put the pen down, walked off, and began the next thing. I proceeded to live my life, my new and strange life with chronic illness. It is not the Annie living that I do, where everything is only a day away. There’s usually plenty of everything in the current day, and I try to make it be good, too. I don’t use the YOLO philosophy anymore either, which often seems to be the excuse for doing things like having a pizza-eating contest or doing parkour on the third story of a building (I will neither confirm nor deny my past participation in such actions.) Instead I try to live knowing that even if I don’t know if I’ll be alive tomorrow, there’s no way I know right now that I won’t. I want to live life beautifully, honorably, uprightly. I want to live passionately and fully. I want to live so that my legacy is good, not bad.

I still can’t bring myself to mark the day on the calendar. Obviously, though, I know when it is. I recite the date every few days to someone in the medical profession, after all. I’m looking forward to spending the day with friends and family, whether that’s in person or virtually. I just want to live every day like it’s a celebration and appreciation of life, in some small way now.

Tomorrow is a blank day, full of the possibility for everything. Everything. Anything.

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