6. Things I Wish My Professors Knew About Being A Chronically Ill Graduate Student

I wish my professors would realize how surreal school sometimes seems to me.

At first, you see, it was hospitals and doctor’s offices that felt surreal. My future life as I imagined it could and did crumple and blow away like dust and ash in rooms with cheerful accent walls, posters of kittens and skeletal systems, and crinkly paper robes. Repeatedly. It was surreal.

Then I spent a lot of time in hospitals, listening to the banter of the night nurses and the jokes of the janitors. Those places became, if not comfortable, at least familiar. School felt surreal then, with its very artificial deadlines and rules. In the ER the deadline for the man who had been hit by a car was real, the rules for resuscitating a patient in cardiovascular collapse because of anaphylaxis were real. School was an absurdity, ridiculous in the amount of effort and stress being expending over 7 pages in Times New Roman that would only ever be read once.

Sometimes it all feels surreal, especially when I jump in between a world where almost everything is life and death to a world where everything is made-up and meant to teach safely. There isn’t a lot of room in my life between those two poles for normal living. I worldjump instead, losing a bit more of myself with each trip until I feel like a ghost, out of place in both planes.

Oddly, the place where there is life and death around every curtain is also the place where dark humor reigns, but the place where there are tests and quizzes behind every classroom door is sometimes taken oh so very seriously. There’s not anything to be done about this — it’s up to me to manage the worldjump. I just wish that my professors knew.

 

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