Bees

I don’t normally photograph other bugs besides butterflies. Partly this is because I’m a bit allergic to a lot of other bugs, and the thought of walking around with baseball-size welts does tend to be a bit of a deterrent. But my long-range lens was working beautifully, there wasn’t a butterfly in sight, and these beautiful, busy, pollen-covered bees were buzzing through the goldenrod.

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Also, hello allergies. 🙂 Ai.

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Skippers

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Somehow I ran out of summer. Just like that. The trees are starting to change from deep summer green to the lighter green of early fall, with the first yellows and reds starting to peep through the curtain.

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Thankfully we haven’t had a hard frost yet, so when I grabbed my camera and went for a walk one evening there were still skippers dancing on the flowers. Wonder of wonders, a few even held still long enough for me to snap a few quick photos.

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The conundrum of summer and fall is that the butterflies like it warm, but I have a hard time with heat. When it gets cool enough for me, only the few and the brave are left. Here’s hoping the weather remains at that perfect fall balance for a few more weeks.

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Skipper on Ironweed

 

DSC_0030There’s an inherent risk with bug photography.

The story behind these shots: I hadn’t been completely sure if I would be able to go out and take pictures the day these were taken. Busy day, strong winds, etc. But I brought my camera. What I forgot… bug spray.

I got a few shots of skippers and a blurred picture of a giant yellow swallowtail for the cost of over 60 bug bites. That’s the point when I stopped counting as I sprayed, creamed, and bandaged the worst of them before heading into class.

Oops.

Do bug photography, prepare to get bitten.

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First Fall Monarch

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I was at the end of a walk, feeling a little tired and disappointed about not getting very many good pictures for all the weight of the camera I’d lugged along, when suddenly a bright orange shape winged above my head. The first monarch of fall. It landed high on a tree and tested its wings against the wind. Shiny, almost tentative, and with nary a scratch or peck on its scaled wings, it must have been a relatively young butterfly.

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I grabbed a couple of quick shots before my long-range lens – and my arms! – gave out, then headed back with the start of fall’s glorious copper flame dancing over my head.

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Flying Sulphurs

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I rarely catch butterflies in flight. Each beat of delicate gossamer wings somehow shoots them in another direction with the randomness of a toddler on pixie sticks.

Some days, though, if you want to take a picture of a butterfly, you have no choice but to follow the dancing, capricious flight through bramble and briar.

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And then, at the end of a merry and largely fruitless t- but enjoyable – chase that left my boots full of seed pods, the sulphur went back to the neatly paved path. 🙂

A sulphur on sulphur.

Walk in the Woods

A few weeks ago I stole some time from the spiky black-and-white demands of my to-do list, exchanging it for the peaceful greens and golds of some woods near my home.

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I do love these woods.

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My cell phone camera could just barely catch this Northern Pearly Eye butterfly as it rested on the bark. It didn’t stay for long, zooming off in the erratic flight of butterflies everywhere up into the canopy, where it was quickly lost in the fluttering of the leaves. I was thrilled – poor picture quality or no, it was the first time I’ve ever managed to get a Pearly Eye on film.

A wonderful walk.

 

Mystery “butterfly?”

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About a week ago, I went for a stroll down the little nature trail in a local park. This little guy obligingly held still, checking the ground for minerals while I shoved my ridiculous cell phone right up his antenna to get a clear shot.

Well.

A nearly clear shot.

I miss my camera!

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I am having no luck identifying this little bug, though. It was light brown, held itself like a butterfly, flew like a butterfly, seemed to be hunting for minerals like a mud-puddling butterfly… and yet, it doesn’t look quite right for a butterfly. It was out around 2pm in the afternoon. I can’t find it in any guide to the mid-western or eastern U.S. It was small, only about the size of a blue or hairstreak.

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Ah, well. I wandered the forest path, blissfully unaware that my keys were missing. It wasn’t until I arrived at my car, still luxuriating in air golden with heat and humidity, that I discovered the loss. People talk about sound shattering the air, but that air, in the triple digits on the heat index, was impervious to the mere blare of a car alarm. The blanket of muzzy gaseous water just wrapped around the sound and smothered it. Shatter smatter, nothing would break that clingy heat.

It wasn’t as enchanting of a walk the second time round. I was just happy I didn’t get sick or faint. I stopped where I’d photographed the bug. It was gone, but my keys were there. One discovery!

One more to go… if anyone knows what type of wee beastie this is, I’d very much like to know.

Camera Woes

I haven’t posted any pictures for quite a while. There’s a good reason for that.

20170811_142826.jpgI broke my first memory card! One of the first ones I ever owned, judging by the low number of gigs it stores. You can’t quite tell from the picture, but the card is bent slightly, the top and bottom have become separated, and the top corner’s plastic is broken.

The good news is I had already pulled the pictures off.

The bad news is the card at least partially broke inside my reader, and the reader, despite my best efforts, remains stubbornly jammed. Something, something small and evil and black plastic, has insinuated itself into the drive and refuses to become dislodged.

Finally, my long-range camera lens is being quite uncooperative. You all know, the heavy ones that stick out like gun barrels and cost as much as the standard pizza delivery car. To be honest, mine isn’t quite that expensive, but it’s valuable to me. Periodically it’s been getting out of alignment, or something that causes it to grind and fail to focus. It doesn’t matter how I beg or plead — or somewhat more productively, carefully clean and work my way gently through the settings — it sometimes works, and sometimes doesn’t. If you don’t want to disturb the wildlife you’re shooting, a long-range lens is vital. I know several photographers who work with different subjects and speak disparagingly of the long lenses, but they’ve never taken pictures of a wasp nest or a badger. I LOVE my zoom. I want it back!!

Too bad there are no camera stores in our area. Sending the lens to Nikon would cost as much as a new one, or very nearly. It doesn’t matter, though, because for a graduate student at the end of summer, it might as well be the cost to go to Pluto for summer vacation. So if anyone out there has had a Nikon lens suddenly grind, freeze, and fail, but only intermittently, let me know what the fix was!

 

 

 

 

Zebra Butterfly – Fan Submission

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This shot was shared with me by a friend (whom I haven’t gotten to see in a long time). She saw the butterfly, thought of me, and then discovered the delights (meaning utter frustration and blinding satisfaction) of insect photography.

I’ve yet to get on on film myself (camera lens is acting up again, sorry folks!). I’m very happy she decided to share this one. There’s not many in our area. 🙂